„Invisible diseases“—Imagination and Magnetism: Paracelsus and the Consequences“ (1998)

My paper
„‚Invisible Diseases‘ –
Imagination and Magnetism: Paracelsus and the Consequences“ .
was read at  the Symposium on
„Transformation of Paracelsianism 1500 – 1800: Alchemy, Chemistry and Medicine“
organized by  the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine
in Glasgow, September 17, 1993.

 

This paper was published:

Heinz Schott, „‚Invisible diseases’—Imagination and Magnetism: Paracel­sus and (he Consequences,“ in The Man and His Reputation, His Ideas and Their Transformation, ed. Ole Peter Grell (Leiden: Brill, 1998), 309-21.

Hei­nz Schott, Bonn

                       „Invisible Diseases“ – Imagination and Magnetism:

                                         Paracelsus and the Consequences

                                                                  I

Some scholars of Paracelsus‘ work showed him as a harbinger of psychosoma­tic medicine. Thus, they interpreted his wellknown treatise De causis morborum invisibi­um (On the invisible diseases)[1] as an essay pointing to modern theories of medical psychology and psychotherapy, in spite of its occult, magical and even cabbalistic impact.[2] I claim the opposite perspective. I assume that the occult, magical and religious content of Paracelsus‘ writings is reflected in modern psych­somatic medicine in a secularized form. To this extent, modern concepts, especially the Freudian paradigm, are disguised latecomers from the period of the Renaissan­ce. The currents of the natural philosophy and the specifically scientific approach of the Renaissance are hidden today, but they are still alive.

When we study the different psychosomatic concepts in the history of medicine, we generally notice the double character of psychosomatic ideas. On the one hand there are ideas, pictures, illu­sions within a person’s mind which may imprint themselves upon his own body or infect other bodies by communication. We may call this the power of imagination (Vor­stellungs- or Ein­bildungskraft). On the other hand there are energies or natural powers which correlate the individual organism with the whole organism of nature. This we may call the correla­tion between microcosm and macrocosm. The most essential idea of natural philoso­phy, from the Stoics up to romanticism, claims that all bodies, including the human organ­ism, are connected by networks of magnetic influence. This concept of magnetism, especially the concept of sympathetic interaction, covers the energetic pro­blem: the trans­ference of vital powers within the body or from one body to another.[3]

Imagination plays a great role in the history of medicine. The images of visualized pictures may represent healing powers (Sigmund Freud’s „Eros“). Others may represent destructive powers (death instinct, Freud’s „Todestrieb“)[4] We know the traditional quasi-scientific methods within the history of medicine: The mantic methods of dream inter­pretation or interpretation of prognostic signs and visions. The painted images of the saints in the Middle Ages, for example, play an impor­tant role in the religious medicine of the Middle Ages. The power of the icons may be explained by a power exerted by imagination over the body functions. Evil imaginations, sugge­stions by the devil or the demons, on the other hand, could produce illness or death. We may think of the imagery of mon­sters predicting social disaster.[5]

The idea of magnetism derives from the cosmological concept of inter­action. Occult powers within the natural world influence the human organism. Magic medicine tries to cure sick persons by so-called magnetic techniques. They tend to strengt­hen the vital forces of the organism: in other words, to accumulate vitality. But there are also destructive powers of magnetism. They weaken vitality and take away life energy – like vampires.[6] The long tradition of magical practices and sym­pathetic cures docu­ments the importance of magnetic influence as a medical idea.

Before we deal with paracelsism and mesmerism we should try to construct a rough typology of psychosomatic models. Firstly, the imago may come from outside into the mind, which takes it up and imprints it on the body. This mechanism is called „introjec­tion“ in psychology. Secondly, the imago may originate from inside the human organism, for example, by a disorder of bodily function. In this case the psyche takes up the imago and regards it as a real phenomenon. This mechanism is called „projection“ in psycho­logy. Both these mecha­nisms, introjection as well as projection, may support either healing processes or destructive ones.

In a similar way, there are two processes of magnetic activity. Firstly, a magne­tic influence from outside means an input of energy into the body. It is a positive transfer which may be compared to charging a battery. The flow of energy through the medium of the nervous system, for example, aims (as a healing method) at strengthening the vitality. Secondly, there is the model of attraction – of driving out the germ of disease. The magnetic power may attract the pathogenic „seed“ (Krankheitssamen according to Paracelsus). The human organism is considered as a psychosomatic entity into which energy can be introduced (input) or extracted (output) by an outside agent. To this extent the power of magnetism is based on transference of energy.

A special method of prophylaxis is the defense mechanism (a term borrowed from Freud’s psychoana­lysis).[7] Special practices such as wearing an amulet, for example, are intended to give protection against both bad images and bad magnetic in­fluences.

                                                                 II

Paracelsus has been often admired as a genius who attained new insight into the human body and mind and their disorders and gave physicians a philosophical and ethical basis for their practice. But he is by no means the founder of the theory of imagination and magnetism. Rahter, he took up more or less common ideas and attitudes of his period and adapted them to his specific purposes. He is a repre­sen­tative of his time.[8] Walter Pagel is the chief among those who have demon­strated the enormous impact of neoplatonism, alchemy, gnosis, and, last but not least, the cabbala on Paracelsus. He is directly in­fluenced by the platonism of Renaissance thought, especi­ally as repre­sented by Marsilio Ficino (1433-1499) and Giovanni Pico della Miran­dola (1463-1494) of the Florentine Academy, as Pagel has stressed.[9]

The influcnce of the cabbala on Paracelsus has usually been underestimated. The religious mysticism of the Jews, its metaphors and symbols, were generally of great interest in the humanistic period. I mention only Johannes Reuch­lin and his fight for the acceptance of the Jewish cabbala.[10] The Christian cabbala developed during the period of the Reformation. Millenianism (chiliasm), Swabian pietism, the Rosi­cru­cians and even romantic natural philosophy and its off­shoots (up to and encluding modern depth psychology) were biased by cabbalistic elements.[11]

Pagel points out: „…even if Paracelsus had no first hand knowledge of cabalistic ideas and sources, he could not fail to arrive at concordant views in his doctrine as a whole as well as in certain specific points. Such concordances are largely the result of the dominant role played by the theory of Microcosm in both.“[12]

This aspect was often ignored by the interpreters, at least in the German tradi­tion. It may be a consequence of either open or more subtle antisemitism that they imagined Paracelsus as the „Luther of physicians“ (Lutherus medicorum).[13] He appeared as the incarnation of the German art of healing, a genius fighting against un-German trends in medical theory and practice. This interpretation flourished during the Third Reich, a subject explores by Udo Benzenhöfer recent­ly[14]. Antisemitic and anti-scholastic state­ments by Paracelsus seemed to prove his independence not only of the Jewish tradition but also of the classical authorities of galenism and arabism. Such sentiments, which were not evaluated within their historical context, could be taken to serve as affirmations of nationalistic and imperialistic propaganda. Thus, it was often overlooked „that Paracelsus was a strong admirer on the Caba­lah“, as Kudlien put it.[15]

Important concepts of Paracelsus point to cabbalistic sources. I will just hint at his central term Licht der Natur (light of nature). In a treatise belonging to the topic of the „invisible diseases“, Paracelsus identifies the cabbalistic art with the adept’s discoveries in the  „light of nature“ within himself: „Look at Adam and Moses and others, they searched for that within themselves that is in man and opened it, and it belongs all to cabbala; they knew no strange things from the devil or [evil] spirits, but from the light of nature; that is what they evoked within themsel­ves.“[16] The inward approach to the divine sources of the spiritual light recalls the mystical practices of the cabbala (and other religious sub­sy­stems). The successful process depends on a quasi-scientific scholarly self-purifi­cation. From the „Sohar“, the holy scripture of the cabbala, we know about the model of the divine light emanating throughout the material world, the famous doctrine of Sefiroth.[17]

Material things absorb the divine light, covering it like clothes and producing darkness. The sun, often visualized as the „eye of God“, symbolizes the archaic fount of divine light and wisdom. Like the sun, God sends life energy to all beings on the earth. „The glamour [created by God] went from one end of the world to the other and then remained hidden“, we read in the „Sohar“.[18] „The whole of heaven is nothing other than imaginatio influencing man, producing plagues, colds, and other diseases“, we hear from Paracelsus.[19] The same happens in the micro­cosm, i. e. within the individual human organism. Paracelsus uses the metaphor of an inner sun: „Well, what else is imaginatio than a sun within man, having such an effect in his globum [body], that is, where on it shines.“[20] In­deed, there are – according to Pagel – „concordances in detail between the lore of the Cabalah and the teaching of Paracelsus.“[21]

Let us come to the main topic. What is the basic model of imagination and magne­tism for Paracelsus? Firstly, the attractive power of the magnet symbolizes the power of imagination, moreover, Paracelsus identifies both powers. “ As the magnet can attract steel, there is also a magnet in the imagination, which also attracts. There is an imaginatio like a magnet, and an impressio like the sun and heaven, making a man by the power vulcani.“[22] Paracelsus gives us an example (Exem­pel), a parable to explain the identity of imagination and magne­tism. The magnet is just a metaphor for imagination: „Without hands and feet, the magnet attracts iron. Like the magnet attracting the visible, the corpora (bodies) are invisibly drawn to the imagination by itself. But it is not the corpus (body) that enters, but what the eyes see and is not palpa­ble, i. e. form and colour …“.[23]

There are two steps: the attraction (incorporation) of an object (ding) by the imagination (a quasi-magnet) is followed by an impression of this introjected object, similar to the sun and heaven impressing man. „What climbs up into heaven is imaginatio, and what falls down is impressio born out of the imagination“.[24] This movement describes a sort of reflex action, crossing microcosm and macrocosm. A macrocosmic reflex occurs, for instance, when the (evil) imagination of a human individual poisons the stars, which send back the poison to the earth causing plagues and disorders.[25]

                                                                III

In his treatise De causis morborum invisibilium (On the invisible diseases) Para­cel­sus uses the term imaginatio to explain the correlation between body and soul. „The imagin­ation is a master by itself and has the art and all instruments and all it wants to produce, for example as a cellarman, painter, metalworker, weaver etc.; … What does imagination need ? Nothing more than a globe on which it can work, that is, the screen on which it paints what it wants to paint.“ In this way, the imagination of a pregnant woman can express itself directly on the body of the child in the uterus: „The woman with her imagination is the workmaster and the child is the screen on which the work is perfected. The hand of the imagination is invisible, the instrument also, and both work together. … So the imagination does its work at that place, in the way the imagina­tion has decided it.“[26]

In this regard, Paracelsus also calls the power of imagination „belief“ (Glaube). Belief is „like a workman’s in­strument“ which can be used for good as well as for bad purposes. Belief can produce all diseases. Paracelsus compares it with a weapon. Disease will be produced when the weapon is active against its own originator. Paracelsus uses the parable of the man with a rifle which exactly describes the reversion of affections (Affektverkehrung) in modern psycho­logy: „We produce our diseases, so we become similar to a man who has got all his weapons and rifles. But when he meets a manikin aiming at him with a ready rifle the big man is anxious about the weapon and is frightened by it – the same happens to us. … When we become weak the power of our belief hits us as a shot from a rifle and we have to tolerate and to suffer what we have thrown against us.“

Belief which is self destructive Paracelsus calls „despair“ (Verzweiflung). It is a reversal of our belief which makes us weak and sick. The rifle is directed against its owner. The pathological imagination may even give origin to an epidemic, for example a plague or pestilence. The most important cause of plague, therefore, is that people in dispair may „poison heaven, so some will suffer from plague depen­ding on their belief.“[27] Imagina­tion becomes a very dangerous phenomenon if it is combined with despair, and so returns to its own origin. As it was pointed out before, this mechanism constitutes a sort of a reflex activity.

Paracelsus compares persons in despair also with a thief, who hangs himself, being in discordance with god and sentenced to self-hanging. „They are not worthy to be hanged by another [person].“[28] The wealthy opposite of despair is „simplicity“ (Einfalt), which is a refuge from self-destruction.[29]

As I mentioned above, the magnet is a symbol or a metaphor for magnetic healing in the context of magia naturalis, natural magic. At the same time, to Paracelsus it is a real instrument for curing several diseases. The magnet symbolizes the occult powers of natural bodies, their secret sym­pathies  (attractions) and antipa­thies (repul­sions) like those of real magnets. In particular, the interaction between certain bodies can be understood by magnetic tech­niques. The modern history of „magne­tism“ as one of the most important ideas of natural philoso­phy and its medical derivations starts with Paracelsus. In the Herbarius Para­celsus describes the ap­plication of the Persicaria. This is a plant with magical healing powers. In the same way as a magnet „marvellously attracts the iron“, Persicaria works against woun­ded flesh. „You may understand the herb, you should know that you have to take the herb drawing it through a fresh stream, then you have to place it on the part you wish to cure for as long as you need to eat half an egg. Then you have to bury it in a humid place so that it can rot, and the disorder will heal in the same time. … It is not necessary to make the sign of the cross over the wound or to pray, because it is a natural action, working naturally, not superstitiously or magically beyond nature.“[30]

The magnetism of the herb is compared with the interaction between a magnet and a piece of iron. As the piece of iron can be magnetized by passing the magnet along its surface, so the wound can be magnetized by stroking the herb over its surface. In both cases a correspondence will develop between two bodies, ensuring that magnetic interaction occurs. How this „concordance“ works is a miracle, a great work of God (­“magnale„), a mystery of nature. However, in ad­dition, the magnet is more than a meta­phor. It attracts not only iron or steel, but also all „martial diseases“ (which come from the planet Mars). So, it supports the influence of the Mars, (e.g. diarrhoea or the menstrual bleeding). The magnet can draw the materia peccans to the right place, so it can be digested and then be driven out at the right time.[31]  The uterus, the stomach and the bowels are organs which can be influenced directly by the magnet. If the uterus is displaced upwards, it can be driven back by the magnet. The same is possible in the case of epilepsy (falling sickness, fallende Sucht). Some magnets in a certain conformation „drive the illness from the head to the center (sto­mach).“ The magnet can also cure convulsions, stop bleeding, and heal haemor­rhoids. No medical author empha­si­ses the power of the magnet more than Para­celsus.

Imagination and magnetism is a main topic for two or three centuries after Para­celsus. The further development of this topic cannot be dealt with in detail here. The dualism between soul and body introduced by René Descartes, the anatomical and physio­logi­cal research on the nervous system and especially the brain (e.g. by Thomas Willis)[32], the new physical paradigms from Kepler to Newton and the development of the physical and chemical analysis of the human or animal organ­ism all specified the concepts of imagination and magnetism. Imagination was increasingly interpreted as an idea fundamentally affecting psychosomatic inter­action. The „invi­sible diseases“ are born of the imagi­nation, explains Paracelsus. The imagination afflicts the spiritual regulation forces, the so-called archeus or archei. A pathological idea (idea morbosa) may infect other human beings and may thus even start an epidemic of dis­ease.[33] The theory of mass psycholo­gy is based on the concept of transferable ideas. The image (imago) seems to be a contagion, like the germ of an infectious disease.

The magnetic effect is more and more explained as a natural law, an analogue to Newton’s law of gravitation. Power (Kraft) is a universal phenomenon, an active prin­ciple, as Newton pointed out. The cosmological ether seems to be the medium of power. It penetrates all matter like subtle rays.[34]

                                                                 IV

When Franz Anton Mesmer started with his „animal magnetism“ in Vienna about 1775, it was obviously not a direct offspring of paracelsian thought. As a doctor Mesmer was quite up to date with the scientific development of medicine.[35] In­deed, he was a repre­sen­ta­tive of the Enlightenment, and – as Robert Darnton pointed out[36] – the mesmerists in Paris played an important role in the French Revolution. The classical concept of Mes­mer’s animal magnetism was based on the new concept of electricity and its therapeutic application (electrical therapy), and the fashionable use of steel magnets for the cure of diseases in the second half of the 18th century. Mesmer’s dogma of a universal fluid (Allflut, fluide universel) was nothing other than a credo in Newtonian physics.[37] Mes­mer believed in his new foundation of medicine as a natural science. Strictly speaking he was an „iatrophysicist“. The transfer of energy as a healing power was mediated by the nerves. By his techniques of magnetization (mesmeriza­tion) Mesmer evoked „crises“ (Krisen) which today can only be understood as psychosomatic or psychodynamic group phenomena. But in his self-understanding Mesmer found no place for any­thing called a „soul“ or „mind“. He did not even discuss the theory of imagination. We know that his critics told him that his animal magnetism was nothing more than the effect of the powers of imagi­nation.[38]

Mesmer was a pure positivist. He systematically ignored the possibility of negative energies or of pathological transfer of the fluidum. His magnetic „manipu­lations“ trans­ferred only the healing power of fluidum; they never had to extract pa­thological com­plexes or matter. Mesmer never used magnetic „passes“ for exorcistic mani­pulation like some mesmerists 30 or 40 years later.­[39]

When mesmerism became an element of the romantic movement and the natural philoso­phy of the early 19th century, the power of imagination was rediscovered. The concept of somnambulism shows us a fascinating combination of the ideas of the power of imagination and the power of magnetism. The altered state of cons­ciousness experien­ced in somnambulism revealed the imagination as a manifestation of nature itself. When a somnambulist patient produced daydreams, visions or prophetic ideas, these were under­stood to be secret messages from hidden (occult) nature. The „Seeress of Prevorst“ (Die Seherin von Prevorst), the famous case history of a patient written by the Swabian doctor and poetrist Justinus Kerner (1786-1862), is a valuable document in the characterization of a concept of the imagi­nation in natural philosophy of the romantic era.[40]

The scientific explanation followed the anatomical and physiological guidelines of the age. People could be mesmerized by directing the vital powers within the nerves from the „cerebral system“ to the „ganglion system“. That means, in practical terms, the vital power had to be pulled down from the head to the stomach (abdomen). That could be managed by magnetic manipulations or it could happen spontaneously. When magnetic life (magneti­sches Leben) according to Justinus Kerner arose in the Seeress, the interplay of imaginations could flourish: e.g. the vision of a secret language of nature could develop or the spirit of a dead grandmother could appear. Even healing of other patients by praying at a long distance was reported.[41]

                                                                 V

Although the romantic speculations about cosmological and religious dimensions of the nature as a whole organism were increasingly rejected by the scientific community in the middle of the 19th century, the mesmerist concept of somnambu­lism provided the first modern psychosomatic model. It was based on anatomical, physiological and clinical findings and furnished physicians with both experimental and treatment me­thods. The research activities of mesmeristic scholars are fasci­nating. Here we see the beginnings of modern psychotherapy, medical psychology and psycho­somatic medicine.[42]

It is interesting to notice traditional concepts in medical practice today. Para­psychological mediu­mism uses imagination and visions for practical purposes. The progress of science has not eradicated the human belief that we may call super­stition. Today we also may see a sort of mesmerists practising magnetopathy with magnetic „passes“ and the magnetic tub (Baquet). Last year (1992) I met a psych­iatrist — a medical doctor – at a workshop on hypnosis, and he told me that he successfully uses the magnetic tub for his therapeutic group sessions. During the sessions he imitates Mesmer by wearing a violet robe and applying magnetic „passes“. The motive for such practices is not, I assume, primarily historical interest. It ori­ginates in discontent with the present situation and the hope of coming into contact with the primary natural sources of life.

Healing methods by „invisible“ powers are very popular again today. I mention only the so-called spiritual healing and magnetopathy (Heilmagnetismus), with its complex religious, spiritual (and even spiritistic), magical and psychological techniques. These phenomena are often condemned as old superstition, but a histo­rical review should take into account their long tradition in the history of medicine and natural (religious) philosophy. The cabbala, for example, plays an important role in the transfer of religious mysticism to natural philosophy and science in the Renaissance. So, Paracelsus as a philosopher and alchemist may sometimes resemble a cabbalistic scholar more than a laboratory researcher or natural scientist in the modern sense.

We should realize the unique situation of paracelsism at the beginning of the modern era. Natural philosophy and natural science were saturated by religious attitudes and rites. Research in the „light of nature“, e. g. the production of new medicines by alchemy, was at once an approach to the light of God, a process of personal purification, and worship. C. G. Jung’s concept of individuation has shown its psychological importance.[43]  The „scientific commu­nities“, small groups of adepts with more or less secret rules of behaviour, were essential. Moreover, there were possibilities for friendly discussions between Jews, christians and muslims without repression – at least, this was an ideal, praised among others by Jo­hannes Reuchlin in the trialogue of his treatise De arte cabba­listica.[44]

The aspect of intensive communication between mutually respecting scientists appears most important to me. Today we need a multi-cultural („multi-reli­gious“) atmosphere in which intellectuals and scientists can exchange their expe­riences and findings to overcome dangerous prejudices.

Finally, it is very interesting that the theory of imagination and magnetism is traditionally linked with social and political phenomena and tries to explain events of mass psycholo­gy, e. g. the attraction a leader exerts on a crowd of people. In this regard Para­celsus again uses the magnet as a metaphor: „You find a man who knows to speak, so that all the world runs to him and listens. Know, then, that his mouth [Maul]  is a magnet, powerfully attracting the people.“ [45]

N o t e s

Abbreviation: Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff = Theophrast von Hohenheim gen. Paracelsus: Sämtliche Werke. 1. Abt. Medizinische, naturwissenschaftliche und philosophische Schriften. Hrsg. von Karl Sudhoff. 14 vols. München, Berlin: Barth, 1929-1933.

[1]….. „Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, pp. 251-350; complete title: „de causis morbo­rum invisibilium, das ist, von den unsichtbaren krankheiten und iren ursachen“.

[2]….. Cf e.g. Werner and Annemarie Leibbrand:Die „kopernikanische Wendung“ des Hysteriebegriffs bei Paracelsus. In: Paracelsus, Werk und Wirkung. Festgabe für Kurt Goldammer. Hrsg. von Sepp Domandl. Wien: Verband der wissenschaftlichen Gesell­schaften Österreichs, 1975; S.125-132.

[3]….. On the concept of sympathy and its metaphoric use in the history of medicine; see Heinz Schott: Sympathie als Metapher in der Medizingeschichte. Würzburger medizinhistorische Mitteilungen 10 (1992), pp. 107-127.

[4]….. The Freudian terminology is very clearly pointed out by J.Laplanche and J.-B.Pontalis: Das Vokabular der Psychoanalyse. Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 1973 (suhrkamp taschenbuch wissenschaft; 7). Cf the articles on „Eros“, pp. 143-145 and „Todestriebe“, pp. 494-503.

[5]….. The mantic interpretation of monsters (Latin: „monstra“) as signs of sin and moral decay have an important impact on modern behaviour against children born with mal­formations; cf Heinz Schott: Die Stigmen des Bösen: Kulturgeschichtliche Wurzeln der Ausmerze-Ideologie. In: Wissenschaft auf Irrwegen: Biologismus – Rassenhygiene – Eugenik. Edited by Peter Propping und Heinz Schott. Bonn; Berlin: Bouvier, 1992; pp. 9-22.

[6]….. The term „Od-vampirism“ (Od-Vampirismus) describes the negative (weakening) powers of persons in the middle of the 19th century according the „Od“ theory of the German chemist Carl Reichenbach; cf Karl Spiesberger: Justinus Kerners „Sehe­rin von Prevorst“ in Betrachtung esoterischer Tradition und im Lichte psychischer Forschung. In: Erich Sopp and Karl Spiesberger: Auf den Spuren der Seherin. Sersheim: Osiris, 1953; p. 64.

[7]….. Cf reference 2: Laplanche/Pontalis, article „Abwehrmechnismen“, pp. 30-33.

[8]….. In this regard we may compare him with Sigmund Freud, who represents the spectrum of the scientific and cultural currents of the 19th century at the turn of the century.

[9]….. Cf Walter Pagel: Das medizinische Weltbild des Paracelsus: Seine Zusammen­hänge mit Neuplatonismus und Gnosis. Wiesbaden: Franz Steiner, 1962; more detailed in Walter Pagel: Paracelsus. An Introduction to Philosophical Medicine in the Era of the Renaissan­ce. 2nd, revised ed Basel; München etc.: Karger, 1982; pp 284-289. The importance of Ficino’s and Pico’s theory for magia naturalis is pointed out by Wolf-Dieter Müller-Jahncke: Astrologisch-magische Theorie und Praxis in der Heilkunde der frühen Neuzeit. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1985; pp. 33-41.

[10]….. Cf Max Brod’s introduction to Reuchlin’s life and work; see note 45. Recently an anthology appeared in print covering the whole topic: L’Hébreu au Temps de la Renaissance. Ed. by Ilana Zinguer.  Leiden; New York; Köln: Brill, 1992; see especially the article by Christoph Dröge: „Quia Morem Hieronymi in Transferendo Cognovi…“ – Les Débuts des Etudes Hébraiques chez les Humanistes Italiens“, pp. 65-88.

[11]….. Cf e.g. Volker Roelcke: Jüdische Mystik in der romantischen Medizin? Kabbali­stische Topoi bei Gotthilf Heinrich Schubert. (1991, in press)

[12]….. Walter Pagel: Paracelsus. An Introduction to Philosophical Medicine in the Era of the Renaissance. Basel u. a.: Karger, 1982; p. 214.

[13]….. This expression appeared as a term of abuse in Basel, where Paracelsus taught as a profes­sor 1527/28; it was also used afterwards in a positive sense; cf Ernst Kaiser: Paracelsus, mit Selbstzeugnissen und Bilddokumenten. Reinbek bei Hamburg: Rowohlt Taschbenbuch, 1984; p. 88.

[14]….. Cf Udo Benzenhöfer (among other articles): Zum Paracelsusbild im Dritten Reich unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der Paracelsusfeier in Tübingen/Stuttgart im Jahre 1941. In: Paracelsus, Theophrast von Hohenheim: Naturforscher-Arzt-Theolo­ge. Ed. by Ulrich Fellmeth and Adreas Kotheder. Stuttgart: Wiss. Verl.-Ges., 1993; pp. 63-79.

[15]….. Fridolf Kud[15]…..lien: Some Interpretive Remarks on the Antisemitism of Paracel­sus. In: Science, Medicine and Society in the Renaissance. Ed. by Allen G. Debus. New York: Neale Watson Academic Publications, 1972; pp. 121-126. Kudlien refers to Walter Pagels interpretation.

[16]….. Cf Paracelsus [: Fragmentum libri de morbis de morbis ex incantatibus et im­pressionibus inferioribus, das ist von den unsichtbaren krankheiten], Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p. 360; present author’s translation. „sich Adam an und Moysen und ander, die haben das in inen gesucht, das im menschen war, und das geöffnet und alle gabalischen und haben nichts frembdes kent vom teufel noch von geisten sonder vom liecht der natur; das haben sie gar herfür in inen gebracht.“

[17]….. Cf. Gershom Scholem: Zur Kabbala und ihrer Symbolik. 7th ed. Frankfurt a.M.: Suhr­kamp, 1992; pp. 16-17; 53-54.

[18]….. Der Sohar. Das heilige Buch der Kabbala. Ed. by Ernst Müller. 5. Aufl. Mün­chen: Diederichs, 1991; p. 50; cf. also pp. 49-52 and 76-78.

[19]….. „als der ganz himel ist nichts als imaginatio, derselbige wirket in den men­schen, macht pesten, kaltwehe und anderst.“ Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 14, p.311 (present author’s translation fo the original quotations).

[20]….. „nun was ist imaginatio anderst, als ein sonn im menschen, die dermaßen wirket in sein globum, das ist, do hin sie scheint?“ Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol 14, p.310.

[21]….. Walter Pagel, Paracelsus, An introduction… [see ref. 9], p. 217. They need to be conside­red by research projects in the future. Recently, such a project – sponsored by the German-Israeli Foundation for Scientific Research and Develop­ment – started: „Jewish and Renaissance Thought in the Works of Paracelsus.“

[22]….. „dan kan der magnes an sich zihen stahel, so ist auch ein magnet do in der imagination, wie ein magnet und ein impressio, wie die sonn und wie der himel, der ein menschen macht in der kraft vulcani.“ Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 14, p. p. 313.

[23]….. „der magnet zeucht an sich das eisen on hend und füß. zu gleicher weis wie also der magnet das sichtig an sich zeucht, also werden auch die corpora unsichtig durch die imagination an sich gezogen. nicht das das corpus hinein gang, sonder das get hinein, das die augen sehen und nicht greiflich ist, also die form und die farbe…“; Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p. 290.

[24]….. „und das herauf kompt in himel, ist imaginatio und wider herab felt, ist impressio, die geboren ist aus der imagination.“ Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 14, p. 314.

[25]….. Cf Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 14, p. 317.

[26]….. Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p. 287.

[27]….. „… das sie den himel vergiften, das er etlichen pestilenz gibt, nach dem ir glaub ist.“ Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p. 280.

[28]….. „nich wert das sie ein ander henk“; Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p. 358.

[29]….. Cf Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p.357.

[30]….. „Damit und ir den brauch des krauts verstanden, so sollent ir wissen, das in der gestalt gebraucht wird, nemlich man nimpt das kraut und zeuchts durch ein frischen bach, demnach so legt mans auf das selbig, das man heilen wil, als lang als einer möcht ein halb ei essen. darnach so vergrabt mans an ein feucht ort, domit das faul werde, so wird der schad gesunt in der selbigen zeit. …das etlich ein kreuz uber die scheden machen, etlich beten darzu; solch alles ist von unnö­ten, gehört nit darzu, dan es ist ein natürliche wirkung do, die das natürlich tut, nit superstitiosisch und zauberisch.“ Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 2, p. 18.

[31]….. Cf the chapter on the magnet in Herbarius: Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, Vol. 2; pp. 49-57.

[32]….. The reflex model introduced by Descartes and the brain research especially by Willis is clearly analysed and illustrated in Edwin Clarke and Kenneth Dewhurst: Die Funktio­nen des Gehirns. Lokalisationstheorien von der Antike bis zur Gegen­wart. München: Heinz Moos, 1973; pp. 69-74.

[33]….. Cf Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p. 279-280.

[34]….. Heinrich Feldt studied the concept of power in regard to the history of magnetism in detail, especially from Kepler and Newton until the 18th century and the concept of mesmerism; cf Heinrich Feldt: der Begriff der Kraft im Mesmerismus. die Entwicklung des physikalischen Kraftbegriffes seit der Renaissance und sein Einfluß auf die Medizin des 18. Jahrhunderts. Med. Diss. Bonn 1990.

[35]….. Mesmers scientific ideas are very problematic; cf e.g. Ernst Florey: Franz Anton Mesmers magische Wissenschaft. In: Franz Anton Mesmer und der Mesmeris­mus. Wissenschaft, Scharlatanerie, Poesie. Hrsg. von Gereon Wolters. Konstanz: Universitäts­verlag, 1988; pp. 11-40. Nevertheless, as a member of the medical faculty in Vienna, Mesmer was well informed about scientific standards.

[36]….. Cf Robert Darnton: Mesmerismus und das Ende der Aufklärung in Frankreich. München: Carl Hanser, 1983 (Original: Mesmerism and the End of Enlightenment in France; 1968).

[37]….. Cf Heinz Schott: Die Mitteilung des Lebensfeuers. Zum therapeutischen Konzept von Franz Anton Mesmer (1734-1815). Medizinhistorisches Journal 17 (1982), S. 195-214.

[38]….. See Heinrich Feldt: The ‚force‘ of imagination in the medicine of late eighteenth century Germany. In: Proceegins of the 1st European Congress on the History of Psychiatry and Mental Health Care. Ed. by Leonie de Goei and Joost Vijselaar. Rotterdam: Erasmus Publishing, 1993; pp. 25-31.

Gereon Wolters pointed out the scientific problem of Mesmer’s theory refused by two commissions in Paris; he analysed the report at the Royal Academy of Sciences as an epistemological document of the Enlightenment; see Gereon Wolters: Mesmer und sein Problem:: Wissenschaftliche Rationalität. In: Franz Anton Mesmer und der Mesmerismus. Wissenschaft, Scharlatane­rie, Poesie. Hrsg. von Gereon Wolters. Konstanz: Univer­sitätsverlag, 1988; pp. 121-137.

[39]….. On Kerner’s exorcistic manipulations see Heinz Schott: Zerstörende und heilende Bestrebungen des „Magnetischen Lebens“: Kerners Forschungsperspektive im Kontext der zeitgenössischen Medizin. In: Justinus Kerner, Jubiläumsband zum 200. Ge­burtstag. Teil 2. Weinsberg: Nachrichtenblatt der Stadt Weinsberg, 1990; pp. 443-450.

[40]….. Justinus Kerner: Die Seherin von Prevorst. Eröffnungen über das innere Leben des Menschen und über das Hereinragen einer Geisterwelt in die unsere. 2 Teile. Stuttgart; Tübingen: Cotta, 1929.

[41]….. See Heinz Schott: Der ‚Okkultismus‘ bei Justinus Kerner – Eine medizinhistori­sche Untersuchung. In: Justinus Kerner: Nur wenn man von Geistern spricht. Briefe und Klecksographien. Hrsg. von Andrea Berger-Fix. Stuttgart: Edition Erdmann, 1986; pp. 71-103.

[42]….. I remember the pioneering work of Henry F. Ellenberger: The Discovery of the Unconscious. 2 vols. Bern: Huber, 1973. Ellenberger shows the importance of mesme­rism and somnambulism for the development of modern ‚dynamic psychiatry‘.

[43]….. Cf. e.g. C. G. Jung: Einleitung in die religionspsychologische Problematik der Alchemie. In : C. G. Jung: Gesammelte Werke, vol. 12; pp. 17-54.

[44]….. Max Brod emphasized this aspect especially in his sympathetic book: Johannes Reuchlin und sein Kampf. Eine historische Monographie. Stuttgart u.a.: Kohlhamm­mer, 1965.

[45]….. „du findest ein man, der kan reden, das im alle welt zulauf, und hört im zu. nu wiß, das das maul ein magnet ist, zeucht an sich die leut in der kraft.“ Paracelsus, Ed. Sudhoff, vol. 9, p. 363.

Advertisements

Die Suggestion und ihre medizinhistorische Bedeutung (2017)

Am Samstag, dem 4.11.2017 hielt ich auf Einladung des Netzwerks Sinnsucher e.V. in der katholischen Familienbildungsstätte in Bonn (Lennéstraße 5) einen Vortrag zum Thema:

Die Suggestion und ihre medizinhistorische Bedeutung.

Der Vortragsraum war sehr gut gefüllt, die Technik vorzüglich.  Der Erste Vorsitzende des Vereins Herr Dr. med. Anton Drähne moderierte die Veranstaltung. Hier meine PPT-Präsentation zum Herunterladen.

 

Magie, Sympathie und Resonanz im Kontext von Medizin- und Kulturgeschichte (2017)

Am 18. Mai 2017 hielt ich an der Hochschule für Künste im Sozialen in Ottersberg (bei Bremen) diesen Vortrag im Rahmen des Wissenschaftlichen Seminars im Sommersemester 2017:

„Resonanz — Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven auf ein Modell“

auf Einladung von Frau Prof. Dr. Céline Kaiser, meiner ehemaligen Mitarbeiterin am Medizinhistorischen Institut der Universität Bonn.

Hier ist das Redemanuskript zum Download.

Hier ist die dazugehörige PPT-Präsentation.

„Du weißt, geliebte Königin …“: Novalis und die Magie der Natur (2017)

Diesen Vortrag habe ich im Rahmen der Festwoche zum 245. Geburtstag von Georg Philipp Friedrich von Hardenberg (Novalis) vom 4. bis 7. Mai 2017

„’Construction der transscendentalen Gesundheit‘: Novalis und die Medizin im Kontext von Naturwissenschaften und Philosophie um 1800“

am 6. Mai 2017 im Schloss Oberwiederstedt gehalten, wo Novalis am 2. Mai 1772 geboren wurde.

Hier mein Redemanuskript als PDF.

Hier die dazugehörige Powerpoint-Präsentation.

Mesmerismus: Ein naturphilosophisches Heilkonzept zwischen Aufklärung und Romantik (2015)

Am 22.07.2015,  einem sehr schönen, heißen Sommerabend hielt ich am Deutschen Medizinhistorischen Museum in Ingolstadt einen Vortrag über Mesmerismus. 

Er war Teil der Vortragsreihe

„Auf neuen Wegen: Medizin zur Zeit Napoleons“

im Sommersemester 2015 und wurde enstprechend angekündigt.

Hier meine Powerpoint-Präsentation.

Der Museumsdirektorin Frau Prof. Dr. Marion Maria Ruisinger gilt mein Dank für die freundliche Einladung.

Vor dem Vortrag spazierte ich durch Ingolstadt in nachmittäglicher Sommerhitze zum Deutschen Medizinhistorischen Museum, das in dem wunderbaren barocken Bau der Alten Anatomie der ehemaligen Universität Ingolstadt — der ersten Bayerischen Universität — untergebracht ist. Im Folgenden einige Fotos.

IMG_0756.JPG

Zuerst suchte ich die Asamkirche auf

IMG_0754.JPG

Die Asamkirche hatte aber kurz zuvor um 17 Uhr geschlossen — schade, wollte ich doch das berühmte Deckengemälde bewundern

 

Mit dem Deckengemälde habe ich mich etwas näher in meinem Buch „Magie der Natur“ auseinandergesetzt, gerne hätte ich es „in natura“ betrachtet …

Hier die betreffenden Seiten aus meinem gedruckten Buch mit den entsprechenden Abbildungen.

285.jpg

Aus Heinz Schott: „Magie der Natur …“, Teil 2, Aachen: Shaker Verlag, 2014, S. 285 — Deckengemälde in der Asamkirche Ingolstadt

286.jpg

Aus H. Schott: Magie der Natur, Teil 2, S. 286 — Deckengemälde in der Asamkirche Ingolstadt

287.jpg

Aus H. Schott: Magie der Natur, Tei. 2, S. 287

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_0751.JPG

Asamkirche – Detailansichten

IMG_0758.JPG

Ingolstädter Patrizierhaus

IMG_0759.JPG

Alte Anatomie der ehemaligen Universität Ingolstadt — Straßenseite

IMG_0760.JPG

Alte Anatomie von der Gartenseite

IMG_0761.JPG

Im Botanischen Garten der Alten Anatomie

IMG_0763.JPG

Der Duft- und Tastgarten

IMG_0762.JPG

Eine Tafel verweist auf den edlen Spender

IMG_0764.JPG

Gewittrige Atmosphäre, deshalb düsteres Licht

IMG_0765.JPG

Ein Brunnen mit Äskulapschlange

IMG_0767.JPG

Im Hintergrund der eingerüstete Erweiterungsbau des Museums

IMG_0766.JPG

Viele Kräuter, Blumen und sonstige Pflanzen sind im Garten zu bewundern

„Triebabfuhr“ oder „unio mystica“? Kontroverse Leitbilder des Sexuallebens in medizinhistorischer Perspektive (2013)

Diesen Vortrag ich auf dem „Auditorium XX“ am 28. September 2013 in Düsseldorf

Hier das Programm.

Schauen wir heute in die Medien, etwa ins Internet mit seinen Portalen für Partnervermittlung, blind dates und Pornos, oder nehmen wir die Produktwerbung oder das Design von Gebrauchsgegenständen unter die Lupe, kommen wir unweigerlich zum Schluss, dass die vom Menschen gestaltete Welt, sozusagen seine zweite Natur, rundum mit sexueller Bedeutung aufgeladen ist. Dabei scheint der Begriff der Sexualität heute klar definiert zu sein, ebenso seine interne Ausdifferenzierung, als da sind: Hetero-, Homo- und Bisexualität, sowie alle möglichen so genannten sexuellen Vorlieben, die vor noch nicht allzu langer Zeit als Perversionen bezeichnet wurden. Ich möchte nun nicht eine bestimmte Untergruppe wie etwa die Homosexualität und ihre soziale oder psychologische Bewertung beleuchten, sondern noch einen Schritt dahinter zurückgehen und den Begriff der (menschlichen) Sexualität überhaupt zur Diskussion stellen. Er leidet nach wie vor unter einer ungeheuren Verengung und Fixierung auf vermeintlich biologische Naturprozesse, auf Reflexvorgänge, die keiner geistigen Beeinflussung und Modulierung zugänglich zu sein scheinen. Nun gibt es in der Kultur- und Wissenschaftsgeschichte freilich auch eine andere Perspektive, wonach diese sexuellen Reflexvorgänge geistig so verändert und gelenkt werden können, dass sie sogar mystisches Erleben ermöglichen, ja, Mystik und Sexualität an einem bestimmten Punkt miteinander verschmelzen können. Insofern möchte ich dem Modell der biologischen Triebabfuhr das der geistigen „unio mystica“ entgegensetzen und damit ein ganz anderes, spirituelles Leitbild von Sexualität thematisieren, das in Wissenschaft, Medizin und Alltagsleben heutzutage keine Rolle spielt. Ich werde im Folgenden in fünf Schritten vorgehen.

(1) Geschlechtstrieb als Naturtrieb: Zur normativen Wissenschaft

Was heißt „Sexualität“ und „sexuell?“ Scheinbar verweisen diese Wörter auf einen unumstößlichen Tatbestand, wonach der Mensch ein Art Doppelwesen darstellt: nicht nur von Vernunft und Bewusstsein gesteuert, sondern mindestens ebenso auch vom Trieb (Instinkt) und Unbewussten. Die Triebe und vor allem der Geschlechtstrieb, wurden traditionell als „Natur-Triebe“ aufgefasst, als „Thier im Menschen“, wie es der Leipziger Philosoph Karl Heinrich Heydenreich im Sinne der Aufklärung um 1800 ausdrückte.1 Er meinte, das Verderben der gegenwärtigen Gesellschaft liege darin, den „heiligen Trieb der Natur“ nur zu einem frivolen Spiele zu missbrauchen. Der Geschlechtstrieb sei „zu einem Spielwerke für unsere spaßhafte Laune“ gemacht, „mehr und mehr verunedelt“ worden.2

Dieses Denken sollte 100 Jahre später im wissenschaftlichen Diskurs gerade der Medizin triumphieren. Denn um 1900 wurde dort die menschliche Sexualität rigoros naturalisiert bzw. biologisiert. Naturgesetzlich festgelegte biologische Abläufe galten als unumstößliche Tatsachen, die zu verletzen Degeneration, Krankheit und letztlich Tod bedeuteten. Sie waren der Maßstab für ein gesundes Sexuallebens und für alle therapeutischen Maßnahmen, seine Störungen zu beheben und pathologischen Abweichungen zu bekämpfen. Die Naturalisierung der Erotik und vor allem die Reduktion der Geschlechterrollen auf die biologisch fixierten Unterschiede gegen Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts kann man mustergültig in einem Hauptwerk der neu entstehenden Sexualmedizin bzw. Sexualwissenschaft beobachten. Der Wiener Psychiater Richard von Krafft-Ebing (1840-1902) definierte in seinem einflussreichen Standardwerk „Psychopathia sexualis“ den sogenannten Naturtrieb in seinen geschlechtsspezifischen Varianten lapidar: „Ohne Zweifel hat der Mann ein lebhafteres geschlechtliches Bedürfniss als das Weib. Folge leistend einem mächtigen Naturtrieb, begehrt er von einem gewissen Alter an ein Weib. […] Dem mächtigen Drange der Natur folgend, ist er aggressiv und stürmisch in seiner Liebeswerbung.“3 Anders sei das Weib veranlagt. „Ist es geistig normal entwickelt und wohlerzogen, so ist sein sinnliches Verlangen ein geringes. Wäre dem nicht so, müsste die ganze Welt ein Bordell und Ehe und Familie undenkbar sein. Jedenfalls sind der Mann, der das Weib flieht, und das Weib, welches dem Geschlechtsgenusse nachgeht, abnorme Erscheinungen.“ Somit unterscheide sich das Weib in der Wahl des Lebensgefährten fundamental vom Mann: Des Weibes „seelische Richtung“ sei „eine monogame, während der Mann zur Polygamie hinneigt.“4

Diese normative Fixierung des „naturgemäßen“ Sexualverhaltens durch die höchsten wissenschaftlichen Autoritäten war seinerzeit unerbittlich. Alles, was sich ihr nicht fügte, galt als eine „Perversion“: „Als pervers muss – bei gebotener Gelegenheit zu naturgemässer geschlechtlicher Befriedigung – jede Aeusserung des Geschlechtstriebs erklärt werden, die nicht den Zwecken der Natur, i. e. der Fortpflanzung entspricht“, meinte Krafft-Ebing.5 Dies betraf vor allem die Homosexualität oder „conträre Sexualempfindung“. Das Erstaunliche sei, dass – anders als beim Zwitter – „vollkommen differenzierte Zeugungsorgane“ vorhanden seien, „so dass also, gleichwie bei allen krankhaften Perversionen des Sexuallebens, die Ursache im Gehirn gesucht werden muss“.6 Homosexualität wurde also letztlich als eine Gehirnkrankheit begriffen. Die homosexuelle Einstellung, „diese eigenartige Geschlechtsempfindung“, erschien Krafft-Ebing als „ein funktionelles Degenerationszeichen und als Theilerscheinung eines neuro(psycho)pathischen, meist hereditär bedingten Zustands“.7 Vielfach lasse sich dieser Zustand auch durch „anatomische Entartungszeichen“ bemerken, fast immer sei „Neurasthenie“ nachweisbar. „Geweckt und unterhalten wird sie durch Masturbation oder durch erzwungene Abstinenz“, so dass sich eine „Neurasthenia sexualis“ ausbilde, die sich „in reizbarer Schwäche des Ejaculationscentrums“ kundgebe.8

Wenn nun diese Auffassung von Homosexualität, Masturbation und Geschlechterrollen heute sicher einhellig zurückgewiesen wird: Bedeutet dies, dass der normative Biologismus per se überwunden ist? Keineswegs, wie ich zeigen werde.

(2) Orgasmus als physiologischer Reflex: Zur biologistischen Ideologie

In der Heilslehre des bis heute umstrittenen Psychoanalytikers und Sozialrevolutionärs Wilhelm Reich stand der Orgasmus bzw. die Orgasmusfähigkeit im Zentrum. Bereits 1927 hatte er deren biologische und politische Bedeutung in seiner Schrift „Die Funktion des Orgasmus“ thematisiert.9 Die Schrift erschien in einer von Sigmund Freud herausgegebenen Schriftenreihe. (Folie) Paradoxerweise hat gerade die Freudsche Psychoanalyse, welche die naturwissenschaftliche Medizin psychologisch transzendieren und anthropologisch reformieren wollte, mit dazu beigetragen, die biologistische Auffassung der Sexualität zu bekräftigen. Interessanterweise veranschaulichte Reich den Sexualakt anhand von „Erregunskurven“, wie sie auch anderweitig in Physiologie und klinischer Medizin nach dem Vorbild der „Fieberkurve“ verwendet wurden.

Reich skizzierte den Verlauf der „typischen Phasen des Geschlechtsaktes mit orgastischer Potenz bei beiden Geschlechtern“ als die Kontur eines Bergs, der auf einer Zeitachse stand. (Folie) Der flachere Anstieg war links vom Gipfel, der steilere Abfall rechts. Beim Anstieg verläuft die Erregungslinie stufenförmig nach oben (in 12 oder 13 Stufen an der Zahl), was wohl die stimulierende Wirkung der einzelnen Koitus-Bewegungen symbolisieren soll und an das Bild eines Treppenaufstiegs erinnert. In den 1920er Jahren war Reich radikal über Freud hinausgehend zum Schluss gelangt, dass die seelische Erkrankung nicht eine sexuelle Störung im weiteren Sinne, sondern die Folge der Störung der „genitalen Funktion, im strengen Sinne der orgastischen Impotenz“ sei.10 Er reduzierte die sexuelle Problematik auf den „sexualökonomischen Energieverlauf“ beim Geschlechtsverkehr und gelangte so zu seiner idealtyptischen Erregungskurve. Die Phase der Spannung und die der Entspannung wurden als einfache Linien gezeichnet, die auf einen Gipfelpunkt hin- bzw. von ihm weglaufen. (Folie) Eine Hemmung der Entspannung entsprach somit einer „gestörten Sexualökonomie“ oder „Stauung“. Die betreffende Zeichnung erinnert an einen Reflexbogen, wie er als ein Grundmodell der Neurophysiologie schon im 19. Jahrhundert etabliert worden war.

Bereits ein Jahr zuvor, 1926, hatte der niederländische Gynäkologe Theodor van de Velde sein später in viele Sprachen übersetztes Buch „Die vollkommene Ehe“ veröffentlicht, das wegen seiner freizügigen Darstellungen Furore machte und sogar vom Vatikan auf den Index gesetzt wurde.11 Dem Autor ging es einzig und allein um die heterosexuelle Konstellation in der „Hoch-Ehe“. Homosexualität oder „Perversionen“ waren für ihn indiskutabel. Als ein Mittel der Rettung der Ehe sei „die rechtzeitige Verstärkung der sexuellen Anziehungskräfte, so daß die entgegengesetzten [d. h. Abstoßungskräfte] überhaupt nicht in die Lage kommen, sich zu offenbaren.“ Auf diesem Wege sollte die „Hoch-Ehe“ „durch Ausbildung der Technik der gegenseitigen Geschlechtsbefriedigung, weit über das in der jetzigen Ehe Übliche hinaus“ erreicht werden.12 Van de Velde gab eine minutiöse Beschreibung des „normalen, ‚gesunden’ Coitus“, die an die Gebrauchsanleitung für ein Küchengerät erinnert. So entwarf van de Velde Verlaufskurven der „Vergattung“, die den „Erregungskurven“ des Orgasmus von Wilhelm Reich entsprachen.

Die Graphiken eines missglückten Koitus erinnern an Fieberkurven, die mit einem angeblich gesunden Idealverlauf verglichen werden. Alle davon abweichenden Verläufe erscheinen als ungenügend oder „abnormal“. So wird „A. Ideale Vergattung“ (Folie) kontrastiert mit „B. Coitus ohne Vorbereitung der erfahrenen Frau“ und „C. Coitus mit einer unerfahrenen Frau nach vorhergehendem Reizspiel“ (Folie) sowie „D. Coitus mit einer unerfahrenen Frau ohne genügende Vorbereitung“ und „E. Coitus interruptus“. (Folie) Letzterer gehöre eigentlich nicht mehr zur Physiologie, da er eine „abnormale geschlechtliche Handlung“ darstelle. Denn für „sexuell vollwertige Menschen“ bedeute der „systematische Coitus interruptus […] eine Abwürgung der Ehe, eine Gefahr für die Gesundheit des Mannes und ein Verbrechen an der Frau.“13

Van de Velde polemisierte deshalb gegen asiatische Sexualpraktiken (die er gründlich missvestand), gegen eine Übertreibung bei den „Hindus, Javanern und anderen Bewohnern des Morgenlandes“. „Was ich aber wohl als sicher betrachte, ist, daß dieses Verfahren für Kulturmenschen der weißen Rasse schon aus ästhetischen Rücksichten nicht in Frage kommt.“14 Denn nach van de Veldes Theorie der „richtigen Vergattung“ bedeutete die Immissio penis ohne Ejakulation ein „wirklicher Exzeß“, „eine Vergattung – die keine ist.“ Entsprechend abartig erschien ihm die Sexualpraktik der „Karezza“, die wir noch eingehender beleuchten werden.

Mit dem Kinsey-Report (1948/1953) und der sich anbahnenden „sexuellen Revolution“ in den 1960er Jahren rückte der Orgasmus der Frau verstärkt in den Blickpunkt von Wissenschaft und Öffentlichkeit. Ein Schüler von Wilhelm Reich, der US-amerikanische Arzt und Psychotherapeut (Körpertherapeut) Alexander Lowen prägte ab den 1960er Jahren nachhaltig den Begriff des Orgasmus in seiner gegenwärtigen Bedeutung. Mit seinem Buch „Liebe und Orgasmus“ wollte er einen „Weg zu menschlicher Reife und sexueller Erfüllung“ aufweisen.15 Er wandte sich in leicht verständlicher Sprache an eine breite Öffentlichkeit, wobei er sich auf langjährige ärztliche Erfahrungen stützte. Im Mittelpunkt des therapeutischen Bemühens standen die „orgastische Impotenz“ bei beiden Geschlechtern.

Lowens mechanistisch-biologistische Normierung des idealen (selbstverständlich heterosexuellen) Geschlechtsakts war frappierend. „Das Becken sollte sich mit der Geschmeidigkeit einer gut geölten Türangel bewegen […]. Beim Mann kommt der Bewegungsstoß von den Beinen und ist völlig vom Ich beherrscht. Während der Mann durch seine Beine ‚geerdet’ ist, ist die Frau in der Rückenlage durch den Kontakt zwischen ihren Beinen und dem Körper des Mannes an ihm ‚geerdet’. Dadurch können sich ihre Bewegungen mit den seinen synchronisieren.“ Damit erhob Lowen die klassische „Missionarsstellung“ zur Norm, die eine Hierarchie der Geschlechter definierte: Der Mann schien direkt an der Erde, die Frau direkt am Mann „geerdet“. Somit war klar, wer wen missionierte.

Als physiologische Voraussetzung des Orgasmus beim Sexualverkehr erscheint heute primär die Potenz (potentia coeundi) des Mannes. Impotenz hat Krankheitswert und ist schon längst zu einem wichtigen Gegenstand von Sexualmedizin und Andrologie geworden. Welche Bedeutung dem Steifwerden des „männlichen Gliedes“ zum geforderten Zeitpunkt gegenwärtig beigemessen wird, mag man am Viagra hype ermessen, der dem betreffenden Pharma-Konzern ein unüberbietbares Milliardengeschäft beschert. „Alternative“ Potenzmittel berufen sich auf die Magie der Natur, um dem Übel abzuhelfen. (Folie) So lautet ein Werbetext für „Vital G MAX“, womit die erektile Dysfunktion angeblich „diätetisch“ behandelt werden soll. „Mit diesem Mittel aus der Apotheke von Mutter Natur. Mit Vital G MAX bekommen Sie kräftige Helfer für Ihre harte und ausdauernde Männlichkeit. Damit tanken Sie den Sex-Kraftstoff von Mutter Natur.“16

(3) Der „sexuelle Reaktionszyklus“: Goldstandard der Sexualwissenschaft

Für die Sexualmedizin wurde gleichzeitig mit der „sexuellen Revolution“ der 1960er Jahre − sicher auch unter dem Einfluss der Vorstellungen von Reich und Lowen − die Theorie der „sexuellen Reaktion“ von Masters und Johnson maßgeblich.17 (Folie) Der so genannte sexuelle Reaktionszyklus läuft demgemäß in vier Phasen ab: (1) Erregungsphase, (2) Plateauphase, (3) Orgasmusphase und (4) Rückbildungsphase. Dabei verlaufe trotz der geschlechtsspezifischen Unterschiede der Reaktionszyklus bei Mann und Frau erstaunlich ähnlich.18 Damit schien ein quasi naturgesetzliches Raster vorgegeben, das bis heute wissenschaftliche Geltung beansprucht und auch in Handbüchern der Sexualmedizin als Goldstandard gehandelt wird.19

Diese Theorie vom sexuellen Reaktionszyklus erscheint als naturwissenschaftlich gesicherte Grundlage, auf der alle möglichen sexualmedizinischen Studien aufbauen. Jeder Phase des Reaktionszyklus lassen sich somit bestimmte Störungen zuordnen. So werden etwa in einer neueren Übersichtsarbeit die Sexualstörungen des Mannes „nach ihrem Auftreten im sexuellen Reaktionszyklus (Appetenz-, Erregungs-. Orgasmus- und Rückbildungsphase) unterteilt.“20 Es stellt sich die Frage, inwieweit nicht auch die heutige Sexualmedizin trotz aller „psychosozialen“ Erweiterungen letztlich biologistisch argumentiert.

Ein weiteres Beispiel für das (relativ) biologistische Verständnis der Sexualität nach der „sexuellen Revolution“ der 1960er Jahre bietet das umfangreiche Standardwerk „Die Sexualität des Menschen“ (1983) des deutschen Sexualwissenschaftlers Erwin J. Haeberle (geb. 1936).21 Auch hier wird die Vier-Phasen-Theorie von Masters und Johnson als grundlegende Lehre referiert und − für Mann und Frau getrennt − breit ausgewalzt. Der Orgasmus erscheint als normales Ziel im „Zyklus der sexuellen Reaktion“, das der Mann leichter erreichen könne als die Frau: „Fast alle Mäner, die die Fähigkeit zur Erektion besitzen, sind auch zum Orgasmus fähig. Das heißt: im Gegensatz zu Frauen, die oft Schwierigkeiten haben, über die Plateauphase hinauszukommen, können sich Männer normalerweise darauf verlassen, den ganzen Zyklus der sexuellen Reaktion zu erleben.“22 Die physiologischen Abläufe würden unwillkürlich, automatisch verlaufen.

Haeberle warnte jedoch davor, vom (biologischen) Sein aufs (ethische) Sollen zu schließen. Denn was als „natürlich“ oder „widernatürlich“ zu gelten habe, hänge vom jeweiligen moralischen Wertsystem ab: „Natur als solche ist wertfrei, sie kennt keine Bevorzugung, keine Richtung, kein Endziel.“23 So sei „widernatürlich“ ein Werturteil und keine Tatsachenbehauptung.24 In dieser Sicht sei „Natur“ eine Ideologie gewesen, demgegenüber „Wissenschaft“ dem Menschen ermöglicht habe, „die Natur unvoreingenommen zu betrachten.“25 Hier wird die typische Einstellung oder Hybris moderner Lebenswissenschaftler sichtbar: nämlich die Überzeugung, die Natur objektiv erfassen und ihre Kausalgesetze ohne Vernebelung durch normative Moralvorstellungen aufzudecken zu können. Der Begriff des Orgasmus in der Sexualwissenschaft, wie ihn Haeberle verwendet, ist hierfür ein Beispiel.

(4) „Heilige Hochzeit“: Sexualität in Mythologie und Mystik

Als Medizinhistoriker wage ich nun in aller Kürze einen Sprung in eine ideologische Gegenwelt zum Triebabfuhr-Modell und spanne gewissermaßen eine historische Kontrastfolie zu ihm auf. Die Heilige Hochzeit (griech. hierós gámos), vielfach auch als Himmlische Hochzeit bezeichnet, ist ein elementarer Bestandteil in den Zeugnissen von Mythologie und Mystik, Hermetismus und Kabbala, Alchemie und Naturphilosophie. Sie handelt von göttlicher Vermählung, unio mystica, himmlischer oder „chymischer“ Hochzeit. Hierbei geht es um eine Vereinigung von Göttern, von Göttern und Menschen oder auch von Menschen untereinander. Insofern die Natur als göttlich angesehen wurde, konnte auch die Naturmystik von Naturforschern und Ärzten als Heilige Hochzeit aufgefasst werden. In der Wissenschafts- und Medizingeschichte waren solche Verschmelzungserlebnisse von Naturforschern und Ärzten mit den Naturdingen für bestimmte wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse und Theoriebildungen oft von entscheidender Bedeutung (z. b. J. B. van Helmont). Bei keinem anderen Thema der Ideen- und Kulturgeschichte ist die Versuchung, historischen Zeugnissen das gegenwärtige, von Biologie und Psychologie geprägte Menschenbild überzustülpen, so groß wie bei der Heiligen Hochzeit. Sie wird heutzutage biologisiert, indem man sie als einen ins Kosmische projizierten Sexualakt ansieht, und sie wird psychologisiert, indem man sie auf einen innerpsychischen Prozess der Reifung oder „Individuation“ nach C. G. Jung reduziert.

Die „Brautmystik“ im christlichen Abendland lässt sich als ein Beispiel für die Heilige Hochzeit begreifen: Christus als Seelenbräutigam, die menschliche Seele als Braut. Die Rollenverteilung der Geschlechter war eindeutig: Christus in der männlichen, die Seele in der weiblichen Rolle. Insofern erscheint es naheliegend, dass in der Mystik gerade Frauen prädisponiert waren, sich in ihrer unio mystica mit Christus zu vereinigen, wie es beispielsweise die Visionen der Hildegard von Bingen im 12. Jahrhundert offenbarten. Vielfach wurden die spirituellen Erlebnisse der unio mystica mit erotischen Farben ausgemalt. Sie drückten eine allumfassende, grenzenlose „Liebe“ aus, die im Gefühlsleben keine scharfe Trennung zwischen abstrakter und konkreter, geistiger und körperlicher Vereinigung zuließ. Hildegard von Bingen habe, so heißt es in ihrer Lebensbeschreibung der Mönche Gottfried und Theoderich, ihr mystisches Erleben als eine „Heimsuchung“ empfunden, dass nämlich „ihr geliebter himmlischer Bräutigam Jesus Christus wirklich seine Hand – d. h. die Wirksamkeit und Eingebung des heiligen Geistes – durch die Öffnung – d. h. durch seine geheime Gnade – gereicht hatte und daß ihr Leib – nämlich ihr Herz – erbebte bei seiner Berührung, das heißt, beim Eingießen seiner Gnade, wegen der ungewöhnlichen Kraft des Geistes […], die sie innerlich spürte.“26Von solchen Verschmelzungserlebnissen berichtete Hildegard mehrfach. Deren erotische Qualität war offenbar nicht vom Alter der Seherin abhängig. Auch noch mit etwa 70 Jahren, während einer weiteren Krankheitsperiode, sei „die Braut Christi einer Heimsuchung von oben“ gewürdigt worden: „Der Schönste und Innigstgeliebte erschien mir in einer wahren Schau. Er erfüllte mich mit solch starkem Trost, daß mein Innerstes bei seinem Anblick wie ein Balsamduft durchströmt wurde. Da jubelte ich vor großer, unermesslicher Freude und wünschte sehnlichst, ihn immer anzuschauen.“27 Eine weiteres herausragendes Beispiel unter vielen anderen wäre die Brautmystik der Teresa von Avila im 16. Jahrhundert, die zwei Stufen der Vereinigung voneinander unterschied: die „geistige Verlobung“ und die „mystische Vermählung“.28 (Folie) Darauf können wir hier nicht eingehen.

5. Mystische Erotik: Zum Leitbild spiritueller Sexualpraktiken

Sexualität erscheint heute in zweierlei Hinsicht enttabuisiert. Zum einen wird der Mensch als biologisch fassbares Triebwesen verstanden, der auch noch im letzten seiner Gemütswinkel vom Geschlechtstrieb bedrängt wird; zum anderen wird Sexualität als Bühne der öffentlichen performance benutzt, auf der der Mensch seine Bedürfnisse endlich offen ausleben kann. Damit geraten zwei Dimensionen des Eros ins Abseits: die von der biologischen Sexualsphäre scheinbar abgekoppelte Macht des Geistes und die sinnlich-private Erfahrung des Eros. Es gibt eine uralte aus dem asiatische Kulturraum stammende Tradition von speziellen Sexualpraktiken, die sich als Ausdruck einer geistigen, d. h. religiösen Vereinigung begreifen. Hierbei wird die Ejakulation des Mannes vermieden und der übliche Orgasmus in ein mystisches Verschmelzungserlebnis transformiert. Das „Tantra“ bzw. der „Tantrismus“ wären hier an erster Stelle zu nennen. Darauf kann ich hier nicht eingehen, insbesondere nicht auf die recht unterschiedlichen Formen mit ihren zum Teil fragwürdigen Vorstellungen und Praktiken. Die Dinge sind keineswegs so simpel auf einen Nenner zu bringen, wie uns neuere Tantra-Massage-Anbieter weismachen wollen.

Ich möchte mich im Folgenden auf eine bestimmte westliche Tradition konzentrieren, die im Zusammenhang mit der Lebensreform- und insbesondere der Sexualreformbewegung im späten 19. Jahrhunderts begründet wurde. Es gab in dieser Zeit esoterische Zirkel und Sekten in Europa und vor allem den USA, die magische Sexualpraktiken mit zum Teil bizarren und höchst phantastischen Ritualen ausübten. Hierbei spielten mesmeristische Praktiken der magnetischen Vereinigung durch die Übertragung von Fluidum oder Lebensenergie kombiniert mit christlich-religiösen Motiven eine zentrale Rolle. Ich will im Folgenden nur ein Konzept in den Blick nehmen, das von einer Ärztin begründet und im Sinne einer sozialmedizinischen Sexualreform mit Erfolg propagiert wurde, nämlich die so genannte „Karezza“. Der Begriff wurde in Anlehnung an das italienische Wort carezza“ (Liebkosung) von der US-amerikanischen Frauenärztin, Lebensreformerin und Frauenrechtlerin Alice Bunker Stockham geprägt, die sich der Ehe- und Sexualreform verschrieben hatte. 1896 veröffentlichte sie im Selbstverlag ein Büchlein mit dem Titel „Karezza. Ethics of Marriage“.29 Eine deutsche Übersetzung erschien bereits im folgenden Jahr.

Für Stockham lagen zwischen der gewöhnlichen Begattung und der Karezza-Vereinigung Welten, wie sich aus der Gegenüberstellung der beiden folgenden Zitate aus ihrem Buch ersehen lässt: „Der gewöhnliche hastige und krampfartige vorgang einer begattung, auf die man sich nicht längere zeit vorbereitet hat und wobei die frau die passive rolle spielt, ist ebenso unbefriedigend für den mann wie für die frau. Er ist schädlich für den körper wie für den geist. Er enthält in sich keine folgerichtigkeit als eine äußerung der zuneigung und ist häufig eine ursache der entfremdung und trennung.“30 Im Kontrast dazu erscheint die Karezza-Vereinigung als befriedigend, gesunderhaltend und als Himmel auf Erden: „Während einer längeren zeit völliger beherrschung sind beide wesenheiten völlig ineinander getaucht und erleben ein unvergleichliche erhöhung in den geist. Das mag begleitet sein durch eine ruhige bewegung, die ganz unter der botmäßigkeit des willens stehen muß, so daß bei keinem der beiden der schauer der leidenschaft die grenzen eines angenehmen gefühlsaustausches überfluten kann. […] Bei gegenseitiger übereinstimmung und genügender zeitlicher ausdehnung führt ein solcher verkehr ohne samenerguß und ohne krisis zu völliger befriedigung. Im verlaufe einer stunde klingt die körperliche spannung aus, die geistige verzückung wächst und führt nicht selten zum schauen höherer welten und zum bewußten erleben neuer kräfte.“31

Die Autorin verband in ihrer Argumentation einen vitalistischen mit einem spirituellen Grundsatz: Die „schöpferische Kraft“ oder „Energie“ kann und soll geistig beherrscht und gelenkt werden. Der Mensch könne frei und bewusst einen der beiden Pfade wählen, „den des geistes oder den der materie“.32 Freilich seien Religion und Philosophie „erforderlich, um leidenschaft zu heiligen.“33 Der Schlüsselsatz lautet: „Auf keinem andern gebiete kann beherrschung den menschen reicher belohnen als in der meisterung unnd heiligung der sexuellen energie.“ Durch „liebe, übung und selbstbeherrschung“ könnten auch Verheiratete durch „vereinigung ihrer beiden seelen“ diese „schöpferische energie“ bedeutend steigern.34 Sie könne auch als Heilkraft eingesetzt und absichtlich geleitet werden, um „einen freund von kummer und schmerzen zu befreien.“35

Stockham war als praktizierende Ärztin in Fragen zu Ehe und Sexualität offenbar eine begehrte Ratgeberin. Die im Anhang ihres Buches abgedruckten Korrespondenzen belegen, dass sie zahlreiche Menschen dazu motiviert hat, die Karezza-Technik praktisch auszuüben. Stockham bezog sich auf eine Reihe von anderen Autoren, die um 1900 in den USA publizierten und von denen sie sich bestätigt sah. Leo Tolstoi, zu dem Stockham freundschaftliche Kontakte pflegte, war so begeistert, dass er eine Übersetzung ins Russische veranlasste und ein Vorwort verfasste.36

Es ist bemerkenswert, dass die Karezza-Idee weder in der Sexualwissenschaft und Sexualmedizin des 20. Jahrhunderts insgesamt, noch bei der „sexuellen Revolution“ und der Studentenbewegung seit den 1960er Jahren eine nennenswerte Rolle spielte. Obwohl Karezza ursprünglich als Mittel der Ehereform mit dem praktischen Ziel der Geburtenkontrolle propagiert, war diese Liebestechnik nicht explizit nur dem heterosexuellen Geschlechtsverkehr vorbehalten. Stockham ging an keiner Stelle auf die Homosexualität ein (sie schloss sie eher stillschweigend mit ein, hat man den Eindruck) − im Unterschied zur Orgasmuslehre von Reich und Lowen, wonach Homosexualität grundsätzlich pathologisch und pathogen war.

Fazit:

Es kann nicht darum gehen, die Dogmatik der gegenwärtigen Sexualwissenschaft und Sexualmedizin durch eine esoterische Heilslehre zu ersetzen, gleichsam zu konvertieren – also einem Eskapismus in eine scheinbar ideale Gegenwelt zu frönen, sei es im Sinne alternativmedizinischer, ökologischer oder religiöser Sekten. Vielmehr ist kritisch zu erforschen, welche emotionalen und geistigen Qualitäten menschliche Sexualität überhaupt haben und inwieweit sie spirituelle, kosmische oder religiöse Dimensionen aufweisen kann − und sollte. Wahrscheinlich ist − neben der Beherrschung von Hass und Aggression − die bewusste Auslenkung der biologisch ablaufenden Sexualprozesse hin zum Reich der geistigen Freiheit die größte Aufgabe der Erziehung und Selbsterziehung des Menschen. Der Freudsche Begriff der Sublimierung weist in diese Richtung, geht es doch letztlich nicht um Unterdrückung, sondern um eine umfassende Entfaltung der Sexualität in all ihren Spielarten. Dann ist letztlich nicht mehr die Frage, was normal und was pathologisch (was hetero- oder homosexuell) ist, sondern ob etwas frei mit göttlicher Liebe oder zwanghaft mit tierischer Brutalität geschieht.

Vortrag auf dem „Auditorium XX“ zum Rahmenthema „Sexuelle Orientierung — orientierende Sexualität“ am 28. September 2013 in Düsseldorf

1 Heydenreich, 1798, S. 11.

2 A. a. O., S. 27.

3 Krafft-Ebing [1886], 1894, S. 14.

4 A. a. O., S. 15.

5 A. a. O., S. 56.

6 A. a. O., S. 231 f.

7 A. a. O., S. 233.

8 A. a. O., S. 234.

9 W. Reich, 1927; 1969.

10 W. Reich, 1969, S. 100.

11 Velde [1926], 1937.

12 A. a. O., S. 19.

13 A. a. O., S. 179.

14 A. a. O., S. 188.

15 Lowen [1965], 1980.

17 Masters / Johnson, 1967.

18 Kokott, 1980, S. 275 f.

19 Nachsehen, ob dies auch für Beuer et al. 2005 gilt!!

20 Rösing et al., 2009, S. 821.

21 Haeberle, 1983.

22 Ebd., S. 281.

23 A. a. O., S. 348.

24 A. a. O., S. 379

25 A. a. O., S. 375.

26 Führkötter (Hg.), 1968, S. 67.

27 A. a. O., S. 117.

28 Teresa von Avila, 1968, S. 206-214.

29 Stockham, 1896.

30 Ebd., S. 18.

31 A. a. O., S. 20.

32 Stockham, 1927, S. 10.

33 A. a. O., S. 15.

34 A. a. O., S. 16.

35 A. a. O., S. 17.

36 Sattler, 1999, S. 136.

Licht als Metapher einer medizinischen Naturphilosophie – von Paracelsus bis Mesmer (Vortrag 2001)

Diesen Vortrag hielt ich auf der Konferenz zum Thema „Licht“, die im Ernst-Haeckel-Haus, Jena, vom 14. bis 16.Dezember 2001 stattfand. Der unveröffentlichte Text ist hier abrufbar.

Das damalige Tagungsprogramm ist hier abrufbar.

Besonders interessant war am Freitag, 14, Dezember 2001 um 17.00 Uhr

der Experimentalvortrag von

Jan Frercks, Heiko Weber und Gerhard Wiesenfeldt
Johann Wilhelm Ritter und die Entdeckung der ultravioletten Strahlen.

Die Veranstaltung fand unter der Leitung von Olaf Breidbach statt, der 2014 verstarb. Am 31. März 2015 hielt ich im Rahmen einer Gedenkveranstaltung des Leopoldina-Studienzentrums in Halle (Saale) den öffentlichen Abendvortrag Olaf Breidbach In memoriam. Unter diesem Link findet man auch das entsprechende Veranstaltungsprogramm.